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  • to attack the Bosnian Serb-held Ozren mountains to relieve pressure on the Maglaj region, These attacks would not only trap Serb forces but would open several government supply lines between Maglaj and Tuzla. -- The Government forces have launched several
  • C05916021 pproved for Release CIA Historical ollections Division AR 70-14 1OCT201 DCI Interagency Balkan Task Force 19 May 1994 Military Status Report for Sarajevo, Gorazde, and Tuzla Summary Both Bosnian Serb and Government forces are now
  • 1994-05-19B, BTF Memorandum re Military Status Report for Sarajevo, Gorazde, and Tuzla
  • request for an American officer to serve as Chief of Staff of UNPROFOR forces; whether or not to support UNPROFOR proposals to reopen Tuzla airport for humanitarian deliveries; possible steps to improve Macedonian sanctions enforcement and elevate
  • International ~ealthAlliance .. Congressman John LaFalce from Buffalo and I than~you, Congressman. The mayors of both Buffalo and Tuzla, than~ you gentleman. Judy Collins, UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador. Sandy Reisenbach, the Vice-president of Warner Brothers
  • the mayors of Tuzla, Bosnia, and Buffalo, N.Y., sign the hospital agreement, I felt pride in our nation's tradition of humanitarian assistance and . , our commitment to democracy in the former Yugoslavia and around the world. . , The hospital partnership
  • discouraging news on the negotiations in New York, made progress toward defining US policy options (tighter sanctions and military intervention), explored pros and cons of an airlift to Tuzla, and reviewed the status of interagency papers in preparation. 2. New
  • under very difficult conditions, both here and in Bosnia. Here in Taszar, our troops are providing the beans, bullets and black oil that are keeping our people in Bosnia fed, armed and ready to roll. In Tuzla, the headquarters for our troops in Bosnia
  • Case Number: 2006-0459-F · FOIA MARKER This is not a textual record. This is used as an administrative marker by the Clinton Presidential Library Staff. Folder Title: Bosnia Trip-Tuzla Troops 1113/96 Staff Office-Individual: Speechwriting-Blinken
  • Bosnia Trip - Tuzla Troops 1/13/96
  • . God bless America. 1/12/96 3 p.m. PRESIDENT WILLIAM JEFFERSON CLINTON RADIO ADDRESS TUZLA, BOSNIA JANUARY 13, 1996 2 Good morning. I am speaking to you today from Tuzla, the main base for America's soldiers in Bosnia. I have just visited
  • to strengthen sanctions? (We will wait at least until after completion of Russian legislature's meeting.) -- Should we try to open Tuzla airport? (Land convoys are getting in and it is not a good location for distributing goods to the countryside, but some see
  • a company of those tanks that ate about to convoy to Tuzla. And when I look out at you, I can't help but thihk that those tanks are a good symbol for this whole operation. The Abrams is the best all around tank in the world, and you are the best all around
  • privately that only 2,500 attempted to withdraw to Tuzla, not the thousands more stated publicly. There are also a number of reasons why government troops did not conduct a stronger positional defense of the enclave. " The Bosnian Army forces
  • Currently 285,000. GORAZDE The original population of 35,000 almost entirely Muslim. about 380,000. IIIIillllllllllllll lllllllllllll lls l l IllllIlII Food and Water TUZLA Estimated currently at 160,000, is now between 70,000 and 100,000.. Ten percent
  • and Serbs flourished side by side in Sarajevo, in Tuzla, -in Mostar and throughout Bosnia. Some of you prayed in churches, some in mosques, some in synagogues. But you lived and worked together, building schools and libraries, trading goods and services
  • areas -Srebrenica,. Zepa, Bihac and-Tuzla. In addition, NATO could strictly enforce the exclusion zones (which would require that new instructions be given to UNPROFOR, to ensure that the UN "key" is turned- when NATO-decides to strike).. Declaring
  • units. All are capable of rapid movement to the vicinity of high-interest areas, such as the Bihac enclave and Tuzla. The Bosnian Serbs routinely move their missiles and guns to make NATO targeting difficult. They are also well-versed in camouflage
  • understand that one such collaboration i s already underway, as New York's Buffalo General Hospital and SUNY have an existing relationship with medical institutions in Tuzla that they have maintained during the war. I t might prove both invaluable and cost
  • in Tuzla, but not very safe to go anywhere else. I couldn't get in to Sarajevo. But I was able to fly out of Tuzla into twobase camps -- Camp Alicia and Camp Bedrock -- to visit with the men and women who were there on the front lines of America's peace
King, Josh (Item)
  • operations there likely would be limited to securing the C05915995 main road between olovo and Kladanj. The Serbs may step-up their shelling of the area to maintain pressure on Bosnian forces and keep o en the possibility of driving north to isolate Tuzla.
  • in Srebrenica; at the same time, to work with the Bosnian government to obtain their consent for the evacuation of the refugees to Tuzla rather than forcing them (Action: State) to remain unsupported behind Serb lines. e To use public statements
  • air activity over Bosnia. This is a topic that comes up in regard to helicopter flights and the reports of fixed wing flights near Tuzla. Ray 'onverse 3
  • a paper for the meeting on options to strengthen UNPROFOR (see TAB D under MEETING PAPERS). Options include securing Sarajevo and Tuzla airports, establishing secure aid corridors to the eastern enclaves, increasing the number of safe areas, and enhancing
  • . There are specific options that may strengthen UNPROFOR ability to perform within its mandate. These include: * Securing Sarajev' and Tuzla Airports. The focal points of international interest in the conflict. Measures would include securing the perimeter
  • affiliated with ."Arkan" have been dispatched to Tuzla and Srebrenica in search of American hostages. We extrapolate from this Serbian paramilitary personnel in Serbia- -beyond the control of Milosevic--might be inclined to embarrass the Serbian President
  • , which is centered around Tuzla, probably could begin production in short order after reliable utility and transportation service resume of the major plants. The Bosnian Serbs use the Tuzla soda ash and the Tuzla coke and coal chemical plants to produce
  • who are doing such an extraordinary job to help peace take hold there, the plane I usually fly on -- that other Air Force One -(laughter) -- was too big to land in Tuzla. And so I flew into Aviano, Italy, and took my C-17 as Air Force One for the day
  • For Immediate Release December 22, 1997 REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT AND THE FIRST LADY TO THE TROOPS Club 21 Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina 5:30 P.M. (L) MRS. CLINTON: Thank you, General. I'm just glad to be back. I was here with Chelsea in March of '96
  • , which appear to be taking root. iEven with the busi~st ,of schedules ' that one'can imagine, duripg'his recent trip to Tuzla, the President met with NGO representatives in Bosnia, all of whom are represented in this room.: , I , I' ','" 'i
  • Serb aggression by extending the threat of decisive NATO air strikes, previously extended to Gorazde, to the other safe areas of Sarajevo, Bihac and Tuzla. At a time when the international community is showing new resolve to stabilize the situation
  • that tens of were ethnically cleansed. thousands of Muslims were either killed or expelled from the area and were forced to seek refuge in remaining Muslim controlled areas such as Tuzla. In many villages an unmistakably deliberate method of destruction
  • the Serbs to dominate a key Bosnian Government-held, all-weather supply route from central Bosnia to Tuzla. * The Bosnian Serbs.claim to have advanced to within sight of the road from Mostar to Jablanica. The road was closed twice over the weekend
  • their advance south of the road. Route Python--which continues north to Olovo and eventually to Tuzla-was the only route the Serbs had from the north, allowing reinforcement of their forces around Vogosca and in Hadzici and Stup. If the Bosnian Army eventually
  • by immediate extension of that decision to Bihac, Tuzla and Sarajevo.) Analysis: This option would deny Milosevic the rewards of the Bildt package until he has obtained a down payment of positive performance from the Bosnian Serbs. We would thereby have a more
  • of the cease-fire. The Bosnian Army would not require major material assistance to defend the "core area"--the central region extending roughly from Tuzla to Mostar. The Croatian Army's breakthrough in UN Sector North has greatly improved the Bihac pocket's
  • the plan, in the first two weeks UK- and French-led units would secure the routes from the Adriatic to Sarajevo, opening the way for U.S. troops to push through to Tuzla and on to the eastern enclaves. The withdrawal of UNPROFOR troops would then unfold
  • into central Bosnia where they could overwhelm relief operations in Tuzla or Sarajevo. Any winter offensive would lead to substantial casualties amongst the civil population because of exposure. Serbs Want the Enclaves The Bosnian Serb leadership has long
  • in the Bosnian safe areas of Srebrenica and Tuzla. Arkan's apparently ongoing ties to Milosevic, however, may lessen the threat to ICFYfrom his forces. " The 32 US ICFY monitors are a large and accessible group of US citizens. If US ICFY personnel return to duty
  • , I was in Tuzla, the main base for the American troops in Bosnia. Our soldiers are heavily armed and very well prepared. But they have come ~o Bosnia on a mission of peace -- together with soldiers from more than two dozen other countries. Their job
  • of democracy that' has enabled us to solve !our problems for ~ore than 200 years. I thought about that, visit in Nepal again when I was 1n Bbsn1a w1th my daughter recently. I met w1th civilians from Tuzla and Sarajevo who described what life was like when
  • , in, TUzla,. And; they ,sat in a circle and told me about what their, ' lives had been like during four years of, war C!-nd ,ethnic violence. Doctors and nurses related how they had 'kept rUdimentary' , faciYities opendespiteibeing bombed d~ily. I heard from
  • members in Oval Office (two events) 6 1/4/96 1/13/96 Visited with families and servicemembers at Aviano AFB, Italy 1/13/96 Visited U.S. troops in Tuzla, Bosnia-Hercegovina; received briefing from !FOR Commanders 1/13/96 Visited U.S. troops
  • attempt to cut off Tuzla and Sarajevo, seize the eastern enclaves, and interdict Bosnian Government lines of communication. It would be unable to destroy the Bosnian Government Army, howeveri I Serbia would be unlikely to undertake provocative action
  • C05961604 " C) Bosnian Army operations in the Ozren mountains have resulted in the capture of a critical stretch of highway that would greatly improve transit between central Bosnia and Tuzla, and Bosnian Government forces threaten to take the entire
  • part We were there last week when the U.N. called for a NATO strike after heavy Serbian shelling of Sarajevo. You all know how the Serbs responded. They shelled the city of Tuzla, killing 71 civilians, most of them children. And they seized more
  • ' 'of' the lessons and 'legacy of those early Gree,k dem9crats . j . . : ." . . .' , -. . I' ." -., , " I , " " , " • " • , ," ",A few:days' ago, I was' in'.Bo~nia visiting American 'troops 'in ' ,Tuzla who, ,along, with soldiers from many other
  • and Zepa. My purpose was to ?Scertain ihe dimensions af the human rights atrocities and crimes that were committAd 1n both cases, and ~o find out what committed_ s~ecific kind9 and categories of abuses were · I travelled to Tuzla and Zenica, and I
  • public/private initiative is the announcement of a partnership joining Buffalo General Hospital of Buffalo, NY with the Tuzla Clinical Center in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzogovenia. The heads of the partnership hospitals, representatives of U.S. and Bosnia
  • are partoftheNATO . peacekeeping force in Bosnia. It was an unforgettable experience, and I believe I even mentioned ... it when I was here in October. Because I will never forget the feeling I had as I went by helicopter from Tuzla, which was the main American base
  • and extremism 'an4 violence because of propaqanda and the 'stir~inq of emotions,th~t are not rooted in oqr common experience, but are dev~sed ·for someone else's political or commerc,ial advantaqe. ~. listened to the men and women who' came to meet me in Tuzla
  • S 1tiv''~ ' roat n "t Y cpta bo nd r .L, 2 M 2 iJ '-i utonomous e pro vce S}2t p a \ ta( ti: "j y' c 't 4 i ., ' r Mao f d Tuzla I VR tL'134Mrkont.j (t "ift } aj ® Lukan 4 dix Bo ni > hed urrs Viz! r .w 't r!TF
  • . Rape Sites Tend to be Small We have identified 34 facilities in Bosnia where women allegedly have, at one time or another, been held and raped (see map). All but two of these sites--one operated by Croats at Odzak and the other by Muslims at Tuzla
  • appears almost inevitable that the Bosnian situation will deteriorate, with a lightening Serbian squeeze on Sarajevo, more Bosnian Government offensives and possibly a major Serbian counterattack to cut off the Government's northern stronghold of Tuzla
  • . To increase the airflow into Sarajevo wouldrequireincreased personnel for ground operations. If Tuzla is opened, the airport is limited to one C-141 or three C-1308 on the ground at any one time. Airdrop of anything other than food or medicine is a difficult
  • in which Serbs are in the minority. doing in eastern Bosnia since early February 1993. They can follow this strategy until only Tuzla, Bihac, and Sarajevo are left and then take these towns one at a time after a prolonged siege. This approach would take
  • . * The Bosnian Serbs control segments of the railroad from Tuzla to Sarajevo and from Sarajevo to the Croatian port of Ploce. Only this main north-south rail line was electrified before the war; the other lines relied on steam and diesel locomotives. Several
  • leaders and won their agreement for the deployment. e US NATO forces set up Checkpoint Cadillac on a road between Orasje and Tuzla on 26 December, according to press. They reportedly crossed Croat and Serb lines and a US officer said IFOR forces were
  • December 5, 1994 February 23-24, 1995 1995 November 5-6, 1995 1995 December 1, 1995 1995 January 13, 1996 4 Date Country Locale Remarks January 13, Hungary Tas7.ar Met with U.S. military personnel. January 13, Bosnia~ Tuzla 1996
Bosnia 2 (Item)
  • of the troops going to Bosnia will go to Sarajevo to help set up the IFOR headquarters there. Most of the other U.S. participants in the enabling force will go to Tuzla, where the 1st Armored Division headquarters will be established under the command of MG Nash
  • airs trikes to protect the UN safe areas and make it possible for relief workers to do their jobs. France and the UK call for airs trikes if the Bosnian Serbs hinder UN operations at Srebrenica and Tuzla. Bosnian Serb leader Karadzicreacts :to .t he
  • recent and fresh, about what it means to face that evil and that indifference today. I can remember sitting in a room in Tuzla, shortly after the Dayton Peace Accords, talking to a group of Bosnians. They were Serbs and Croats and Muslims, although I
  • Tuzla and landed at two outposts, , Camp Bedrock and Camp Al~cia, I saw front of me our very best young people, not unlikelthe young people who are here at Triton trying to make their fut~res as well. I saw men and women. I saw' black and brown and white
  • of their competitions. The athletes will compete in the following: Kada Delle, 10 meter speed walk, Track and Field (b. Tuzla, training in Germany) Dijana Kvesic, Swimming (b. Sarajevo, training in Germany) Janko Gojkovic, Swimming (b. Sarajevo, training in England
  • . And in a world bound ever more closely by currents of commerce and communication, America already is a powerful cx;imple. When the children of Tuzla look up at our f soldiers on patrol, they see not onlj Irish-Americans and African-Americans and ItalianAmericans
  • . And in a world bound ever more c iosely by currents of commerce and communication, America already is a powerful example. When the children of Tuzla look up at our soldiers on patrol, they see not onlj' Irish-Americans and African-Americans and ItalianAmericans
  • corridor near Brcko by about 15 kilometers and cut-off the Sapna salient northeast of Tuzla. A second phase reportedly is planned to eliminate the Bosnian Croat-held Orasje enclave northwest of Brcko. The Croatians believe the offensive will involve about
  • , where a cease-fire has ended months of shelling and fighting; or Tuzla, where the airfield is now being readied for UN relief flights; or Maglaj, where for the first time in months supplies are getting in. Yet progress remains fragile. E~hnic cleansing
  • of Brcko will be determined by arbitration within one year. o I o Seeret 40 Kilometers I i 40 Miles a Canton names 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Una Sana Posavina Tuzla Podrinje Zenica Doboj Gorazde Middle Bosnia Neretva West Herzegovina Sarajevo 10 Uvno
  • 100 square kilometers of territory around Bihac, and limited territory elsewhere. Nevertheless, as the unsuccessful and costly attack in March around Stolice northeast of Tuzla demonstrated, improvements in Bosnian Government forces have not yet
Ron Brown (Item)
  • from Tuzla to Dubrovnik and is now roughly three hours overdue for his scheduled landing there. We were first notified about this by Ambassador Peter Galbraith, our ambassador to Croatia, who phoned the State Department to report that the Secretary's
Bosnia [1] (Item)
  • $60 billion in annual sales to Zagreb, ~ Sarajevo, and Tuzla. · The mission resulted in several achievements: a bilateral investment ~ treaty with Croatia~ a tourism communique ""'ith Croatia; an OPIC agreement with Bosnia; ~ .\-: techni~al advisors
  • the fourth quarter. Who wants to walk off the field and forfeit the game? We should stay, finish the game and take home the win for the world and for peace. All of us on that trip were especially proud to visit with our troops in Tuzla. After five years
  • and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia, and around the world. They always do their mission well. Our mission must
  • once prepJed to go to war agrunst each other now stand side by side, securing:a lasting peace together in BoJnia. When I visited our American troops in Tuzla, Bosnia, I was·so pleased to be able also to meet some of the Russian troops who were stationed
  • talked . with our soldiers, not pnly at the main base. in Tuzla but out at two outposts,' Camp Alidia and Camp' Bedrock, I wished. every American could have been with me. Because there they were, young Americans -- black, white, from country and city
  • availability.· · Vive Zene, Tuzla (Center for traumatized Women and Children) Thz1a organization providing self-help groups for traumatized women, si~ to Medica Zenica. NPA Ce~ter for Women, Z~nica Norwegian People's Aid psychosocial .eentfr fot
  • . larger then expected press corps on hand (some from Foreign Press Center). Note: this was FLOTUS' first public evpnt since Friday's testimony. FLOTUS spoke of ecumenical efforts for reconcilliation and rebuilding. She referenced POTUS" Tuzla visit. She
  • and supplies to treatment centers in Tuzla, Bosnia. A specia1 medical program serves ' war-injured children. http://www.intrescom.org/fa~t.html 11/1/99 . -------------------------:------.---------- The International Res~ue Committee Page 2 of4 In· light
  • to. this nation. Right now, as you are here missing your loved ones, they are missing you just as much. At Aviano, in Tuzla ... and in other places ,. around the world, from the Sinai Desert to the DMZ in Korea to. Soto Cano, Honduras, they are hard at work
  • (autonomous UN province) Northern Zone , Prijedor Orasje Bihac I Banja Luka Oobo Brcko' t Sask Bijeljina \-Most Tesanj Teslic UN Southern o Zone Jajce, n-- Tuzla-- ,Ribnica ,iZenica Srebrenica Olovo Vitez Vakuf. Knin . Maglai Glamoc
  • " in American society. (Article on Page A2l (Article on P,ag"'e""B"-'ll.;..l--~-* * * 1 1I * * * · u.r. ld ur.: J 1 Heavy fighting broke out in central Bos. Stock prices climbed to new highs n or -n u.t-e ~ nia and the strategic Tuzla region. The once again
  • of strength and hope, not divisiveness: : Shortly after the Dayton Peace Actords, I was in Bosnia. And I met in Tuzla with a group of men and women-primmily wom~n Orthodox Chlistians, Catholic Chlistians, Muslims and even a Jew-who had survived the horrific
  • in humanitarian aid. In 1994, the UN expanded UNPROFOR’s mission to the protection of “Safe Havens” around the cities of Sarajevo, Gorzade, Srebrenica, Tuzla, Zipa, and Bihac. The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) began to receive request for support from
  • off the field and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit with· our troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of our nation. We must make it our mission to keep our trobps well-trained and ready ... improve their quality
Bosnia (Item)
  • , With water and electricity . a~>cut, streets deserted and supplies ebbing because of a blockade and ,J,;'sniping by Serbs. Shelling by Serbs also wounded more civilians in . :lr:: besieged TUZLA. · · .'·~f. PRESERVATION PHOTOCOPY "The hope has been all
Bosnia [1] (Item)
  • will come from larger cities. Of the · 18 communities surveyed in the Federation, a disproportionately large percentage of travelers will be departing from west Mostar, Sarajevo, Tuzla and Zenica. In the Republic, more will be traveling from Brcko
  • ahead in the fourth quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what
  • , in and around the safe guard the Bosnian capital, Sarajevo, as areas in the Republic of Bosnia and well as the towns of Tuzla, Zepa, SreHerzegovina, to support the United Na- brenica, Gorazde and Bihac. These reptions Protection Force in Its mandate." resent
  • said it best: this is like being ahead in the fourth quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women
  • the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia, and around the world. They always do their mission well. Our mission must be to keep
  • in Srebrenica could proc.ed. and to see whether the airstrip at Tuzla could be opened. . lean only tell you what happenea1n the 1I.et1nqs. The secretary Ganeral of NA.TO aDd % both 8a1d that the••' Iteps should Dot b. calle4 for unlGsl everyone vot1n9
  • was a land that found strength in its diversity. Muslims, Croats and Serbs flourished side by side in Sarajevo, in Tuzla, in Mostar. They prayed apart. But they lived and worked together-- building schools and libraries ... trading goods and services
  • of commerce and communication, America already is a powerful example. When the children of Tuzla look up at our r soldiers on patrol, they see not onlj Irish-Americans and African-Americans and ItalianAmericans ~ they see Serbian-Americans, Croatian-Americans
  • been with us to visit with troops in Tuzla. They are thei pride of our nation. 42 \ We mustmake it our mission to keep our troops welltrained and ready . . . improve their quality of life . . . and st pay for the 21 century weapons they need
  • off the field and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit with our troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of our nation. 42 We must make it our mission to keep our troops welltrained and ready . . . improve
  • . Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us tj/visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia, and around the world
  • have seen our troops in Tuzla. They are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia. And America is very proud of them. One of those brave soldiers is sitting with the First Lady tonight ~ Army Sergeant Michael Tolbert. His father was a decorated
  • . Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory. I wish all of you could have been with us to visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia, and around the world
  • troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia, and around the world. They always do their mission well. 43 Our mission must be to keep ourtrops well-trained and ready . . . to improve
  • in the fourth quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory. JL k *~ ' » I wish all of you could have been with us to visit with m o ar troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of o r nation. y, h^Jr We rmist
  • ahead in the fourth quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory. 43 I wish all of you could have been with us to visit with our troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of our nation. We must make it our
  • been with us t^r visitor troops in Tuzla. They are the pride of our nation; After fiyej^ears as Presid ent, them4^rre-1iTrTTg I know with certainty: give our men and women in uniform a clear and purposeful mission and they deliver. We must make it our
  • dreadful moments for me. I will never forget. After the mortar hit the Tuzla nightclub, the press said to me, "So now do you feel better? This is what happened because you kept insisting on bombing." It was perfectly dreadful, especially since the bombing
  • and The Firsl Ladydeparl Dining Hall via ~~routeDepartun:An:a,Tu~aAirBue,Turla,Bo5ni" (drive time: 5 minure.( Th .. Pr.-sidt nl and The Fl rsl Lady arrive Departunl Anla,Tuz/a Air ~RJ~~~~-H~rugovina Th .. Pr,."lde nt and The First Lady depa.rt Tuzla Air Base
  • to my office and tried to establish contact with the representatives of some of our organizations in Srebrenica. I was unable to get in touch with anyone. That is why I went to Tuzla and found out that 25,000 people had come from Srebrenica to Tuzla
  • the reports that I'm sure you have all seen that Secretary Ron Brown's aircraft is unaccounted for on a flight as part·of his delegation that he has been leading in former Yugoslavia. The Secretary, our understandtng is at this point, was flying from Tuzla
  • for UNHCR efforts to assist in the movement, care and supply of the refugees and the Dutch UNPROFOR troops in Srebrenica; at the same time, to work with the Bosnian government to obtain their consent for the evacuation of the refugees to Tuzla rather than
  • THE SUBSTANCE OF THE ISSUES THEMSELVES TO THE NEGOTIATIONS. WITH RESPECT TO THE SREBRENICA MISSING, SOMMARUGA TOLD AMB. SPIEGEL THAT HE IS SENDING A VERY STIFF LETTER TO KARADZIC DEMANDING AN EXPLANATION. ICRC INTERVIEWS OF SREBRENICA REFUGEES IN TUZLA INDICATE
  • shortly after the peace accords were signed, when it was safe enough to go to our' base in Tuzla, but not very safe to go anywhere else. I couldn'tget in to Sarajevo. But I was able to fly out of Tuzla into two base camps -­ Camp Alicia and Camp Bedrock
  • AND THE FIRST LADY TO THE TROOPS \ Club 21 Tuzla, Bosnia-Herzegovina 5:30 P.M. (L) MRS. CLINTON: Thank you, General. I'm just glad to be back. I was here with Chelsea in March of '96. And as we've been meeting some of you around the camp, I've encountered
  • Tuzla w1th the regulars, not Bosman Croat militiacember by forme~ president jimmy i Serb stronghold of Bijeljina, the . men;· se~ Dinar~ to open a. back · . :. ·. . · ·. . -::Carter. Looking funereal in a dark . headqu~rter~ qf t~e Pa.!lthers~ t~e
  • in Tuzla. After tive years as President, there is one thing I know with certainty: give our men and women in uniform a clear and purposeful mission and they deliver. We must make it our mission to deliver for them. My balanced budget will allow us to keep
  • , and Alovo, where there have been report* of a m^Jor Serb offensive building up, which could, in fact, cut Tuzla offfrom Saretfevo. Are any of those areas active candidates, in your view, for something similar to the Sarajevo ultimatum
  • return by committing sufficient reconstruction funds to 18 target areas located in eight different regions of Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Sarajevo and its suburbs, the ".Anvil" in western Republika Srpska, Gorazde, Tuzla, Odjak, Zenica, Mostar, and Bihac
  • the victory. 43 I wish all of you could have been with us to visit our troops in Tuzla. Our wonderful men and women in uniform are very proud of what they are doing in Bosnia, and around the world. They always do their mission well. Our mission must
  • behind Dubrovnik. • • U.S. forces and continue to flow into 'the U.S. ~toi in and around Tuzla. Over 16,000 military personnel are now deployed in the Area of Operations:
  • . Govern· Corey Pavln won the U.S. Open_ golf * * * ment forces, meanwhile, launched an attack championship at Shinnecock Hills-Golf Club At least 46 New Era c~edit~rs made on Serb forces near Tuzla in the northeast. 1 in Southampton. N;Y., by two strokes
  • dignitaries, I was going through the line and there standing was the Mayor of Tuzla. For every American in uniform, he is now our mayor, and we are a part of his family efforts to bring peace and freedom to all the people of Bosnia. Galatians says, "Let
  • Fr TN 1/12 Fr TN 1/13 Sa BO «Mi^Address^Mma)^fe^i;;,-,^^lfeC: 1/13 Sa IT ,f4y'iano;rAir Base. I ta I v 1/13 Sa BO , Tuzla/AirSegp^^S;;^^:;^ 1/13 Sa HU 1/15 Mo GA 1/17 We VA 1/18 Th DC 1/18 Th DC l/19Fr DC 1/19 Fr DC llSISii
  • Tuzla in Bosnia. Sefore I ariived there by 'helicopter earlier this' weskto' see " . , ' . . ~. • , ~. , ~ ,some of our troQps~ I ha.d a hard time imagining what life must be likeforth~ , Ameri~men and wom~n s~rving as part of the NATO p~Cek
  • the city. The one Government-held road into town — a small mountain track — is being fired at regularly with heavy machine guns and mortars. The worst single shelling incident of the war, in which 71 people were killed in the northeastern town of Tuzla
  • a l i n g w i t h a p o t e n t i a l mounting refugee problem i n Tuzla. f £ ) -r SECRET 20227 M c U r \ LI NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL WASHINGTON. D.C. 20506 March 15, 1993 MEMORANDUM FOR MR. LEON FUERTH A s s i s t a n t t o t h e Vice President
  • recent and fresh, about what it means to face that evil and that indifference today. I can remember sittingin a room in Tuzla, shOltly after the Dayton Peace Accords, talking to a group of Bosnians. They were Serbs and Croats and Muslims, although I could
  • ~begovic, !Ambassador to Sweden Mr. Jakob Finci, :president of the Jewish Community in Bosnia and Herzegovina Mr. Igor Rajner, President of the Jewish Municipality Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina Ms. Dragica Le~ Secretary General of the Jewish Community
  • : Kada Delic, 10 meter speed walk, Track and Field (b. Tuzla, training in Germany) Dijana Kvesic, Swimming (b. Sarajevo, training in Germany) Janko Gojkovic, Swimming (b. Sarajevo, training in England) Nedzad Fazlija, Shooting (b. Foca) Samir Karabisic
  • and the Bosnian Croat faction has ended the deadly siege of Mostar. The threat of intervention by Croatian troops has ended. In the embattled east, the airport in Tuzla is now open. It is becoming easier and safer to move around the country. We hope that planners
  • – Tuszar Troops 1/13/96 [OA/ID 3387] Bosnia Trip – Aviano Arrival 1/13/96 [OA/ID 3387] Bosnia Trip – Tuzla Troops 1/13/96 [OA/ID 3387] Bosnia Trip – Radio Address 1/13/96 [OA/ID 3387] Bosnia Trip – Croatia Crowd [OA/ID 3387] Bosnia Trip – Most Recent Drafts
  • in cities such as Sarajevo, Tuzla and Zenica and with some independent local TV and r:adio stations. Under present conditions the three nationalist parties that rule their separate entities control the relevant media, giving them an unfair advantage
  • with us to visit with our troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of our nation. We must make it our mission to keep our troops well-trained and ready . . . improve their quality of life . . . and pay for the 21 century weapons they need to defeat any enemy
  • better in reality. 3 I'm speaking from first hand experience. Last month, I visited our troops in Bosnia, who are doing such an extraordinary job to help peace take hold. The plane I usually fly on was too big to land in Tuzla. So the Air Force made
  • SHELLED TUZLA AIRFIELD, WHI (H IS UNDER UN CONTROL. ACCORDING TO PRESSl 1.4c I ONE SHELL LANDED ON THE RUNWAY AND UN ENGINEERS ARE ASSESSING THE EXTENT OF THE DAMAGE. 1.4c UN MILITARY OBSERVERS REPORT THAT FIGHTING BETWEEN BOSNIAN SERB AND GOVERNMENT
  • Muslims Turns Into Free For A l l Tony B i r t l e y Bosnia 2:40 UN Convoy Arrives In Tuzla; Nine Die During Journey Charles Glass Tuzla 2:00 UN Security Council Votes To Enforce No F l y Zone Over Bosnia Peter Jennings New YorX 0:25 No New Money i n
  • to walk offithe field and fo'rfeit the victory.· . . I . . I wish all of you could have been with us to visit w~th our troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of our nation. We must make it our mission to keep pur troops well-trained and ready
  • root. Even with the busiest of schedules that one can imagine, during his recent trip to Tuzla, the President met with NGO representatives in Bosnia, a l l of w o are hm represented in this room. I'd like to deviate from the program for just a moment
  • in Tuzla. They're very proud of what they're doing in Bosnia. And we're all very proud of them. (Applause.) One of those. brave soldiers is sitting with the First Lady tonight -- Army Sergeant Michael Tolbert. His father was a decorated Vietnam vet. After
Race (Item)
  • As Diplomatic E f f o r t s F a i l Richard Gizbert Tuzla, Bosnia 1:30 College Basketball Coaches Seen As Saviors; Coaches Cash I n Armen Keteyian Amherst, MA 4:35 Heavy Fog Blamed For 100-Vehicle P i l e Up I n Alabama Peter Jennings New York 0:20 Govt Money
  • shelling the Bosnian capital. The Bosnian Serbs responded this evening by shelling five of the six Bosnian towns designated as "safe areas" by the United Nations. The Serbian assault was most intense in the northern town of Tuzla, where initial reports
  • * * * . (Articles on Pages Cl. C2. C25lnd C18) Shipped to the.menswear retailer. I SkIes. deared a bit over Bosma, alloWing * * *. (ArtIcle on Plge 84) . 16 U.s.. military fligbts tp lanjl .. at ,Tuzla. * *. * headquarters for a U.S. peacekeeping force . Fleet
  • the field and forfeit the victory." I wish all of you could have seen our troops in Tuzla. They're very proud of what they're doing in Bosnia. And we're all very proud of them. One of those brave soldiers is sitting with the First Lady tonight-- Army
  • the victory. 43 I wish all of you could have been with us to visit with our troops in Tuzla. They are they pride of our nation. We must make it our mission to keep o^^csyps welltrained and ready .. . improve their quality of life . . . and st pay
  • ' ability to resist BSA attacks in built-up urban areas such as Sarajevo, Tuzla, and Bihac, it probably would not prevent the loss of smaller towns and villages. -- Muslim use of mortars would force the BSA to disperse its artillery, but the lack of fixed
  • of resolve, Bosnian Serbs seemed less than cowed," s h e l l i n g Tuzla i n northern Bosnia. (WP) U.N. peacekeepers also reported sniper f i r e i n Sarajevo. (WP) The New York Times's John K i f n e r reported t h a t Serb forces stepped up o f f e n s i v
  • ends in June. I think Senator Dole actually said it best. He said, "This is like being ahead in the 4th quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory." I wish all of you could have seen our troops in Tuzla
  • experi~c. Dut publicity about this projeel will alao creato ifcMCI' 11\lpport asnons the general public for current troop prcsenco &1\d support for the rebuilding procca. Prc:ss cont'ea'ei\CU will be held in Tuzla, and upcm the dolcgatkm'a ~urn lo Vienna
  • and reduction in the .. safe areas" of Srbrenica, Tuzla, Zepa, Gorazde, Bihac and Sarajevo. Top Players Jockeying for Position to Succeed Deng By Rone Tempest= (c) 1995, Lo.,; Angeles Times= BEIJING Even after former Shanghai Mayor Jiang Zemin was given the top
Greece [1] (Item)
  • of a possible"! snipers when they tried to fetch drink- large-scale influx of refugees inu> Tuzla." r».n , ing water. Ethnic 'self cleansing* points to three ethnic mini-states. J 1 r :; ;o THE NEW YORK TIMES, SATURDAY, MAY22,1993 As Unity Nears
  • Bosnian Serb missile attack on the i city govemment building in the capii tal, Sarajevo, heavy sniper fire throughoui that city and Bosnian Serb shelling of the northern city of Tuzla. u CD S w > c z 2 W h i/5 m 3 Qi O > - w Z w Clinton Open
  • h i s initiative? Tuzla: Reports i n d i c a t e serious shortages i n the Tuzla area. What are Mrs. Ogata's views on the opening o f Tuzla a i r p o r t and under what scenario does she t h i n k t h i s might be DECLASSIFIED IN PART CLINTON
  • does Mrs. Ogata assess the prospects f o r t h i s initiative? Tuzla: Reports i n d i c a t e serious shortages i n the Tuzla area. What are Mrs. Ogata's views on the opening of Tuzla a i r p o r t and under what scenario does she t h i n k t h i s
  • and the petition by thf fenders. Nations. State Department experts provided a In SARAJEVO, the United Nations In TUZLA, in Bosnia, as Muslims dramatic look at the internal debate'in Commander in BOSNIA, Gen. Phi- and Croats continued to fight, | the Administration
  • on the Serbs in Bosnia." Mr. Hurd added that Foreign Minister Alain Juppe of France had suggested bringing in American troops as soon as possible to help protect five "safe havens" — Zepa, Tuzla, Gorazde, Bihac and Sarajevo — declared last week by the United
  • intentions to remove heavy weapons - strike packages were re-planned for targets outside the Sarajevo area. At 1425, UN requested CAS support following BSA shelling of UN positions near the Tuzla airport; three flights of fighters supported the CAS request
Budget [3] (Item)
  • . I think Senator Dole actually said it best. He said, "This is like being ahead in the 4th quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory." I wish all of you could have seen our troops in Tuzla. They're
  • ahead in the 4th quarter of a football game. Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory." I wish all of you could have seen our troops in Tuzla. They're very proud of what they're doing in Bosnia. And we're all very proud of them
  • the field and forfeit the victory." (Applause.) I wish all of you could have seen our troops in Tuzla. They're very proud of what they're doing in Bosnia. And we'·re all very proud of them. (Applause.) One of those brave soldiers is sitting with the First
  • . Now is not the time to walk off the field and forfeit the victory." (Applause.) I wish all of you could have seen our troops in Tuzla. They're very proud of what they're doing in Bosnia. And we're all very proud of them. (Applause.) One of those brave
  • of· the le.ssons and legacy of those early Greek democrats. A few days ago, I was in Bosnia visiting American troops in Tuzla who, along with soldiers from many other nations, including Gre~ace, are part of NATO's peacekeeping mission. There, I saw. · what happens
  • measures to relieve the eastern Bosnian town ot Srebrenica, where Canadian U.N. peacekeepers are trapped, and to reopen the airport in the northeastern Bosnian town of Tuzla. NATO officers said that it was unlikely air strikes wnuld be launched before
  • radiation. rized air strikes to relieve Srebrenica and Tuzla, two Bosnian towns besieged by Serbian forces, their talks with Secretary of State Warren Christopher last week yielded little else. After French Foreign Minister /Main juppe publicly chided
  • at the White House. Within days, he suggested, there is a probability of air strikes limited to the hills around Sarajevo and perhaps also the perimeters of two other besieged towns, Srebrenica and Tuzla. "This would be entirely within the context of giving
Press (Item)
  • France PARIS, Jan. 24 — The Uniled Slates insisted at the NATO summn meeung and France clashed openly today over that the 16 allies call for ureeni acuon. including air strikes, to open Tuzla a French request that lhe Clinton Adairport in northeastern
Newsclips [4] (Item)
  • Na1iOllll 00 possible air ~;;; lh'el\O!$ftia. The team is ~ 10 Iy to Ctoa.tia next few /lays. 'I'he mea bebtnd the planned air I!itt'lli!S: Reopen Tuzla airport and allow repl:acement of co. nadlan U.N. trOOpS SlUCiI; in the besieged enclave at S
  • ply ask the Unlt!~d States Senate to heed this the field and forfeit ,the victory," ' plea and vote on the highly qualified judich.l 1 wish nIl of you could havt1 seen our troops in Tuzla. They're very proud of what they're nominees bcfore you, up
Budget Stuff (Item)
  • B r i t a i n Allows Head of MI-5 to be Photographed for the F i r s t Time Tom Brokaw Nev York i 0:20 40 DN Says i t May be Forced to Pull Out of Bosnia Tom Brokaw New York 0:15 41 Residents of Cut-off Bosnian Town of Tuzla Steal Aid Food Keith M i
  • and reported that the two sides reached an agreement on opening a i r corridors for humanitarian supply f l i g h t s for the besieged c i t y of Tuzla. (WP) The New York Times's John Kifner reported that U.N. o f f i c i a l s are "increasingly worried
  • -277C NETWORK HEADLINES Tuesday May 11, 1993 ABC World News Tonight 1 Clinton May send US Troops to Macedonia John McWethy Washington 2:55 2 Croatian Forces Continue to Attack Muslins Peter Jennings New York 0:20 3 Tuzla's Hospital Crowded with Bosnian
  • in the weeks ahead (is) going to be in the overaU peace negotiations." And, Perry said other options, "are certainly weeks away. They're not days away." The United Nations did say it plans to reopen Bosnia's Tuzla airport on March 7, an action NATO last month
  • of Musliiti conirolled territory s I'etching up through central Bosnia, ryirih of Sarajevo, to Tuzla, a Muslimheld industrial c ly in the noriheast. | Uniled Nalionsjofficers said they had i f )und no evidence that any Muslim I £ 'Idlers had beej in lhe
  • Tom Brokaw New York 2:60 31 Heaviest Fighting I n Bosnia Yet As Muslims And Croats Battle Tom Aspell Tuzla 2:00 3 2 Clinton Meets With Advisors To Discuss situation i n Bosnia John Dancy Washington 1:40 33 Cautious Optimism I n Ohio Prison Standoff
  • around the suburb of Vogosca, where Bosnian Army defenders were reponed to have attacked in an effort to capture strategic high ground. At least three shells landed wiihin vehicles in a private relief convov bound for the northern city of Tuzla left
  • be ignored, no matter what t h e continent." BOSNIA -- The Washington Post led w i t h John Pomfret's r e p o r t t h a t . "Two Danish tank platoons pounded Serb p o s i t i o n s w i t h 72 s h e l l s during a 90-minute b a t t l e near Tuzla i n
  • South Africa Explode Into Violent Riots Keith M i l l e r Johannesburg 2:20 30 Recent Serbian Attack on C i v i l i a n s Leaves the Worid Outraged Kate Aidy Tuzla 1:10 31 President Clinton Feels Pressure To End Fighting I n Bosnia Jim Miklaszewski
  • Belgrade; Serbs Launch Offensive In Bihac Tom Aspell Tuzla, Bosnia 1:50 24 Price War Waged Between The Major Tobacco Companies Robert Hager Washington 1:50 25 More Questions Than Answers At Waco Compound Tom Brokaw New York 26 Gang i n i t i a t i o n
  • With Leaders To Discuss Military Action In Bosnia Andrea Mitchell Washington , L ^. . 23 UN Sanctions Hit Belgrade; Serbs Launch offensive In Bihac Tom Asoell Tuzla, Bosnia 1:50 24 Price War Waged Between The Major Tobacco Companies Robert Hager Washington 1:50
  • do Sarajevo,'it's on to Zenica and Tuzla." As General Rose's plan is evolving, the critical issue of the Serbian gunners' either withdrawing their heavy weapons in the hills surrounding the city or putting them under United Nations control is being
  • this fall, the mayor of St. Louis U.N. to open the airport at Tuzla. announced. The football team has been in * • # Southern California for 4 years. 9 House Speaker Gingrich accused the media of "nitpicking," saying Murdoch sought no favors in his dispute